Bearden senior meets President Obama, works with organization in D.C.

Bearden+senior+Sergio+Uribe+attends+the+%22Organizing+for+Action%22+meeting+in+Washington%2C+where+he+had+the+chance+to+meet+President+Barack+Obama.

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Bearden senior Sergio Uribe attends the "Organizing for Action" meeting in Washington, where he had the chance to meet President Barack Obama.

Not many East Tennessee high school students can say that they’ve had the pleasure of meeting President Barack Obama, but one Bearden senior can.

Sergio Uribe, along with around 200 others from around the United States, was presented with this opportunity through a group called Organizing for Action.

“I didn’t quite get a picture with him, but I got to shake his hand, and that was pretty cool,” Uribe said.

According to their website, Organizing for Action is “the grassroots movement fighting for the agenda Americans voted for in 2012,” and their cause is something Uribe is passionate about.

“Mainly, it’s just the whole idea of fairness for me,” Uribe said. “I wasn’t born in the United States; I was born in Colombia, so I could have been one of those millions of people who are here illegally, and there are a bunch of opportunities that you don’t get if you’re not an American citizen, and I want to help people get those opportunities.”

Through the organization, he’s met people who he believes will help him in the future.

But politics aren’t all he’s into. Apparently, he’s a Shakira fan, and he really enjoys Italian food and “Modern Family”.

Economics teacher Mr. Matt McWhirter describes him as “aware” and “curious.”

Uribe starts his first semester at the University of Tennessee in the fall and plans to study political science.

“After [college], I want to be able to go into the work that I like,” Uribe said. “I don’t think I’ll run for office, but I’ll be one of those people who finds someone I really admire and believe can do good for the world, and I’ll help them win elections.”

His friends see him succeeding in politics in the future as well.

“I see him as a politician in Washington D.C. and an activist for a big cause and eventually organizing the campaign for his little brother to become President of the United States,” said senior Ashley Bushée, one of Uribe’s closest friends.

If the political science degree doesn’t work out, Uribe plans to go into graphic design because he likes to draw.

Regardless, Uribe has big plans for his future. Maybe one day people will line up to shake his hand.